A breakthrough in electric torque tool technology is set to further advance the capability of electric underwater robotic vehicles.

SaabSeaeye logoA new lightweight electric torque tool is being launched globally in a collaboration agreement between Saab Seaeye, a world leader in electric underwater e-robotic systems, and Australia-based Total Marine Technology (TMT).

The tool is smart, light, simple to fit, fast to set-up, has an advanced, high accuracy torque control system and can operate across the Saab Seaeye range of e-robotic vehicles, opening up new market opportunities.

Considerable savings will come from using compact electric e-robotic vehicles and electric tooling for tasks normally performed by much larger hydraulic vehicles.

No smaller electric class 1-4 torque tool exists on the market and with a singlehanded weight of just 24 kilos, it is around half the weight of a typical hydraulic torque tool, reducing the risk of manual handling injuries.

A major benefit for subsea operators is the tool’s ability to adapt automatically to Class 1 to 4 fittings and torques whilst performing the integrity-critical task of opening and closing seabed valves and other torque tensioning tasks.

Torque accuracy is vital for operators needing to trust a system not to damage a valve when opening and closing. Electric torque systems are far more accurate over the whole torque range when compared to hydraulic systems and deck calibration is quick, repeatable and simpler, saving setup cost.

Helps avoid risk to older valves

An electric system can provide highly accurate small torque values so is extremely useful where there is an inherent risk of damage to older valves when turned, as they may be in poor condition.

The electric torque tool with its built-in drive and torque measurement is effectively self-calibrating across its full torque range, saving considerable operation and vessel time – and significant costs.

Current hydraulic torque tools operated by hydraulic vehicles are typically set and checked multiple times for a particular torque range before each dive, using a tested and certified calibration unit, whereas in future the electric torque tool need only be calibrated by an independent body on an annual basis.

Accuracy and control are standout features with the TMT torque tool as the software-managed system allows much finer control and feedback than hydraulic systems. Operators control torque pressures by dialing in torque limits, speed, and number of turns and watch the response on screen immediately. Pitch and roll sensors in the tool aid rapid alignment during critical tasks.

In addition to opening and closing valves the tool can be used in a wide range of tasks including installation and recovery of control leads and hoses, and closing and tensioning of connectors and bolts.

A typical hydraulic torque tool weighing around 50 kilos is generally held out in front of a vehicle by a heavy-duty manipulator, so needs a large vehicle.

Photo2As the TMT tool is half the weight it can be fitted to a smaller robotic work vehicle such as the Saab Seaeye Leopard – and can even be underslung to operate from an even smaller robotic system such as the Tiger.

The lightweight torque tool can operate in an underslung skid from small electric robotic vehicles such as the Saab Seaeye Tiger.

Whilst on an inspection mission a compact electric vehicle can intervene to operate a valve, thereby avoiding follow-up intervention and reducing the number of excursions.

This pioneering development demonstrates how electric underwater e-robotics are increasingly undertaking serious intervention work as the market trends towards an all-electric future.

Subsea operators worldwide are expected to welcome a new electric torque tool that will enable electric underwater robotic systems to undertake an even wider range of subsea tasks and bring considerable cost savings.

Both Saab Seaeye and TMT see their collaboration as the start of a jointly beneficial relationship, with Saab Seaeye marketing the tool exclusively in the Northern Hemisphere and TMT in the Southern Hemisphere.

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